Monday, February 20, 2006

Development rhetoric revisited

On the 2nd Feb 2006, I wrote this post regarding Easterly's paper titled "Planners Vs Searchers in foreign aid" in which I pretty much commended the fresh angle to development economics.
>
...my views have changed slighly....
>
As the caveat on my blog states, "these are just [my] views with the caveat that reality is fluid", I have come across a counter-commentary that I was referred to by one of the readers on this blog, that bolsters some criticisms that I had but didn't mention.
>
The counter argument is provided by one Amartya Sen in the website titled: Foreign affairs.
>
So where did I agree with Easterly.
>
Generally speaking, these are the broad areas:
>
1. In the criticism of the continued use and teaching of outmoded development economics theory and analysis.
>
2. In the continued failure by planners to apply project management principles such as "post-implementation-reviews" and hence a failure to learn from the past.
>
3. The fact that on some general scale, some planner actors are just people with bills to pay and families to raise and so don't really care about development but need a job to survive and a development job is as good as any. This lack of passion affects the effectiveness of the entire system (systemic problem).
>
But Easterly has been duly criticised for "forgoeing the opportunity for a much-needed dialogue, opting instead for a rhetorical drubbing of those whom he sees as well-intentioned enemies of the poor."
>
...And also for the subtitle of his book (another thing that raised immediate questions in my head) :The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good. To this title, Amartya Sen responded in parenthesis that:

"As it happens, the empirical picture of the actual effects of international aid (which, incidentally, does not come only from white men, since Japan is a major participant in the effort) is far more complex than Easterly's shotgun summary suggests."

Do yourself some justice and read the worthy counter-argument that follows. I feel that Amartya Sen has made many good points.
>
Click on the following link: The Man Without a Plan by Amartya Sen

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home